Global Movement – Day 1

Something is happening around the world – for the first time in the history of human communication, people around the globe are connecting in a way never thought possible, showing solidarity with protesters in countries they may never visit, yet recognize a common struggle, a shared humanity.

But in order to analyze these phenomena, we must first seek to define it. In the Global Movement breakout, we started by opening a conversation to think about just what we’re referring to when we say “The Global Movement”, and what the limits of this definition are. Are we just talking about the USA, Egypt, Greece and Spain? IS it just groups who use the terms “Occupy” or “Indignados”? What about Canada, Mexico, Portugal, and Italy? What about protests happening in China, Hong Kong, South Africa, and Macedonia? Are not the indigenous struggles of the world fighting the same enemy of  corporate imperialism and globalization as the working classes of the industrialized world?

We saw many potential topics to research. It was an interesting discussion that rotated as people came in and out, but some noticeable threads included:

> Similarities/Differences in methods of internal/external communication of communites
> Commonly Reoccurring 
> What kind of spaces did they protest/perform in?
> What kind of resistance did they operate under – (threat of fines, spatial controls?)
> Who initiated the protests?
> Spatial practice / movement through urban space …
> visual analysis – montage or collage of images representing the spatial, visual tactics
> How do they learn?
> Documentation Practices (Do assemblies around the globe document using Livetweeting, like @LibertySqGA?)
> Diaspora of Terms, Language
> The spread of occupations, practices like GA facilitation, use of structures

Challenges still remain of identifying data that is both readily available, and actionable.

One possible idea for a workable project was to track differences in Facilitation practices across Occupy groups in the US and Spain.